Improving QEMU security part 6: TLS support for character devices

Posted: August 16th, 2016 | Author: | Filed under: Coding Tips, Fedora, libvirt, OpenStack, Security, Virt Tools | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments »

This blog is part 6 of a series I am writing about work I’ve completed over the past few releases to improve QEMU security related features.

A number of QEMU device models and objects use a character devices for providing connectivity with the outside world, including the QEMU monitor, serial ports, parallel ports, virtio serial channels, RNG EGD object, CCID smartcard passthrough, IPMI device, USB device redirection and vhost-user. While some of these will only ever need a character device configured with local connectivity, some will certainly need to make use of TCP connections to remote hosts. Historically these connections have always been entirely in clear text, which is unacceptable in the modern hostile network environment where even internal networks cannot be trusted. Clearly the QEMU character device code requires the ability to use TLS for encrypting sensitive data and providing some level of authentication on connections.

The QEMU character device code was mostly using GLib’s  GIOChannel framework for doing I/O but this has a number of unsatisfactory limitations. It can not do vectored I/O, is not easily extensible and does not concern itself at all with initial connection establishment. These are all reasons why the QIOChannel framework was added to QEMU. So the first step in supporting TLS on character devices was to convert the code over to use QIOChannel instead of GIOChannel. With that done, adding in support for TLS was quite straightforward, merely requiring addition of a new configuration property (“tls-creds“) to set the desired TLS credentials.

For example to run a QEMU VM with a serial port listening on IP 10.0.01, port 9000, acting as a TLS server:

$ qemu-system-x86_64 \
      -object tls-creds-x509,id=tls0,endpoint=server,dir=/home/berrange/qemutls \
      -chardev socket,id=s0,host=10.0.0.1,port=9000,tls-creds=tls0,server \
      -device isa-serial,chardev=s0
      ...other QEMU options...

It is possible test connectivity to this TLS server using the gnutls-cli tool

$ gnutls-cli --priority=NORMAL -p 9000 \
--x509cafile=/home/berrange/security/qemutls/ca-cert.pem \
127.0.0.1

In the above example, QEMU was running as a TCP server, and acting as the TLS server endpoint, but this matching is not required. It is valid to configure it to run as a TLS client if desired, though this would be somewhat uncommon.

Of course you can connect 2 QEMU VMs together, both using TLS. Assuming the above QEMU is still running, we can launch a second QEMU connecting to it with

$ qemu-system-x86_64 \
      -object tls-creds-x509,id=tls0,endpoint=client,dir=/home/berrange/qemutls \
      -chardev socket,id=s0,host=10.0.0.1,port=9000,tls-creds=tls0 \
      -device isa-serial,chardev=s0
      ...other QEMU options...

Notice, we’ve changed the “endpoint” and removed the “server” option, so this second QEMU runs as a TCP client and acts as the TLS client endpoint.

This feature is available since the QEMU 2.6.0 release a few months ago.

In this blog series: