ANNOUNCE: gtk-vnc 1.0.0 release

Posted: August 7th, 2019 | Author: | Filed under: Fedora, Gtk-Vnc, Virt Tools | No Comments »

I’m pleased to announce a new release of GTK-VNC, version 1.0.0.

https://download.gnome.org/sources/gtk-vnc/1.0/gtk-vnc-1.0.0.tar.xz (211K)
sha256sum: a81a1f1a79ad4618027628ffac27d3391524c063d9411c7a36a5ec3380e6c080

Pay particular attention to the first two major changes in
this release:

  • Autotools build system replaced with meson
  • Support for GTK-2 is dropped. GTK-3 is mandatory
  • Support for libview is dropped in example program
  • Improvements to example demos
  • Use MAP_ANON if MAP_ANONYMOUS doesn’t exist to help certain macOS versions
  • Fix crash when connection attempt fails early
  • Initialize gcrypt early in auth process
  • Emit vnc-auth-failure signal when SASL auth fals
  • Emit vnc-error signal when authentication fails
  • Fix double free when failing to read certificates
  • Run unit tests in RPM build
  • Modernize RPM spec
  • Fix race condition in unit tests
  • Fix install of missing header for cairo framebuffer
  • Fix typo in gir package name
  • Add missing VncPixelFormat file to gir data

Thanks to all those who reported bugs and provides patches that went into this new release.

Easier QEMU live tracing using systemtap

Posted: February 18th, 2019 | Author: | Filed under: Coding Tips, Fedora, Virt Tools | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

QEMU is able to leverage a number of live tracing systems, the choice configurable at build time between

  • log – printf formatted string for each event sent into QEMU’s logging system which writes to stderr
  • syslog – printf formatted string for each event sent via syslog
  • simple – binary data stream for each event written to a file or fifo pipe
  • ftrace – printf formatted string for each event sent to kernel ftrace facility
  • dtrace – user space probe markers dynamically enabled via dtrace or systemtap
  • ust – user space probe markers dynamically enabled via LTT-ng

Upstream QEMU enables the “log” trace backend by default since it is cross-platform portable and very simple to use by adding “-d trace:PATTERN” on the QEMU command line. For example to enable logging of all trace events in the QEMU I/O subsystem (aka “qio“) we can

$ qemu -d trace:qio* ...some args...
23266@1547735759.137292:qio_channel_socket_new Socket new ioc=0x563a8a39d400
23266@1547735759.137305:qio_task_new Task new task=0x563a891d0570 source=0x563a8a39d400 func=0x563a86f1e6c0 opaque=0x563a89078000
23266@1547735759.137326:qio_task_thread_start Task thread start task=0x563a891d0570 worker=0x563a86f1ce50 opaque=0x563a891d9d90
23273@1547735759.137491:qio_task_thread_run Task thread run task=0x563a891d0570
23273@1547735759.137503:qio_channel_socket_connect_sync Socket connect sync ioc=0x563a8a39d400 addr=0x563a891d9d90
23273@1547735759.138108:qio_channel_socket_connect_fail Socket connect fail ioc=0x563a8a39d400

This is very simple and surprisingly effective much of the time, but it is not without its downsides

  • Inactive probes have non-negligible performance impact on hot codepaths
  • It is targetted to human consumption, so it is not easy to reliably process with machines
  • It requires adding arguments to QEMU’s command line so is not easy to enable in many cases
  • It is custom to QEMU so does not facilitate getting correlated traces across the whole system

For these reasons, some downstreams chose not to use the default “log” backend. Both Fedora and RHEL have instead enabled the “dtrace” backend which can be leveraged via systemtap on Linux. This provides a very powerful tracing system, but the cost is that the previous simple task of printing a formatted string when a probe point fires has become MUCH more complicated. For example to get equivalent output to that seen with QEMU’s log backend would require

# cat > trace.stp <<EOF
probe qemu.system.x86_64.qio_task_new {
    printf("%d@%d qio_task_new Task new task=%p source=%p func=%p opaque=%p\n", 
           pid(), gettimeofday_ns(), task, source, func, opaque)
}
EOF
# stap trace.stp
22806@1547735341399862570 qio_task_new Task new task=0x56135cd66eb0 source=0x56135d1d7c00 func=0x56135af746c0 opaque=0x56135bf06400

Repeat that code snippet for every qio* probe point you want to watch, figuring out the set of args it has available to print.This quickly becomes tedious for what should be a simple logging job, especially if you need to reference null terminated strings from userspace.

After cursing this difficulty one time too many, it occurred to me that QEMU could easily do more to make life easier for systemtap users. The QEMU build system is already auto-generating all the trace backend specific code from a generic description of probes in the QEMU source tree. It has a format string which is used in the syslog, log and ftrace backends, but this is ignored for the dtrace backend. It did not take much to change the code generator so that it can use this format string to generate a convenient systemtap tapset representing the above manually written probe:

probe qemu.system.x86_64.log.qio_task_new = qemu.system.x86_64.qio_task_new ?
{
    printf("%d@%d qio_task_new Task new task=%p source=%p func=%p opaque=%p\n",
           pid(), gettimeofday_ns(), task, source, func, opaque)
}

This can be trivially executed with minimal knowledge of systemtap tapset language required

# stap -e "qemu.system.x86_64.log.qio_task_new{}"
22806@1547735341399862570 qio_task_new Task new task=0x56135cd66eb0 source=0x56135d1d7c00 func=0x56135af746c0 opaque=0x56135bf06400

Even better, we have now gained the ability to use wildcards too

# stap -e "qemu.system.x86_64.log.qio*{}"
23266@1547735759.137292:qio_channel_socket_new Socket new ioc=0x563a8a39d400
23266@1547735759.137305:qio_task_new Task new task=0x563a891d0570 source=0x563a8a39d400 func=0x563a86f1e6c0 opaque=0x563a89078000
23266@1547735759.137326:qio_task_thread_start Task thread start task=0x563a891d0570 worker=0x563a86f1ce50 opaque=0x563a891d9d90
23273@1547735759.137491:qio_task_thread_run Task thread run task=0x563a891d0570
23273@1547735759.137503:qio_channel_socket_connect_sync Socket connect sync ioc=0x563a8a39d400 addr=0x563a891d9d90
23273@1547735759.138108:qio_channel_socket_connect_fail Socket connect fail ioc=0x563a8a39d400

Users still, however, need to be aware of the naming convention for QEMU’s systemtap tapsets and how it maps to the particular QEMU binary that is used, and don’t forget the trailing “{}”. Thus I decided to go one step further and ship a small helper tool to make it even easier to use

$ qemu-trace-stap run qemu-system-x86_64 'qio*'
22806@1547735341399856820 qio_channel_socket_new Socket new ioc=0x56135d1d7c00
22806@1547735341399862570 qio_task_new Task new task=0x56135cd66eb0 source=0x56135d1d7c00 func=0x56135af746c0 opaque=0x56135bf06400
22806@1547735341399865943 qio_task_thread_start Task thread start task=0x56135cd66eb0 worker=0x56135af72e50 opaque=0x56135c071d70
22806@1547735341399976816 qio_task_thread_run Task thread run task=0x56135cd66eb0

The second argument to this tool is the QEMU binary filename to be traced, which can be relative (to search $PATH) or absolute. What is clever is that it will set the SYSTEMTAP_TAPSET env variable to point to the right location to find the corresponding tapset definition. This is very useful when you have multiple copies of QEMU on the system and need to make sure systemtap traces the right one.

The ‘qemu-trace-stap‘ script takes a verbose arg so you can understand what it is running behind the scenes:

$ qemu-trace-stap run /home/berrange/usr/qemu-git/bin/qemu-system-x86_64 'qio*'
Using tapset dir '/home/berrange/usr/qemu-git/share/systemtap/tapset' for binary '/home/berrange/usr/qemu-git/bin/qemu-system-x86_64'
Compiling script 'probe qemu.system.x86_64.log.qio* {}'
Running script, <Ctrl>-c to quit
...trace output...

It can enable multiple probes at once

$ qemu-trace-stap run qemu-system-x86_64 'qio*' 'qcrypto*' 'buffer*'

By default it monitors all existing running processes and all future launched proceses. This can be restricted to a specific PID using the –pid arg

$ qemu-trace-stap run --pid 2532 qemu-system-x86_64 'qio*'

Finally if you can’t remember what probes are valid it can tell you

$ qemu-trace-stap list qemu-system-x86_64
ahci_check_irq
ahci_cmd_done
ahci_dma_prepare_buf
ahci_dma_prepare_buf_fail
ahci_dma_rw_buf
ahci_irq_lower
...snip...

This new functionality merged into QEMU upstream a short while ago and will be included in the QEMU 4.0 release coming at the end of April.

Announce: Entangle “Sodium“ release 2.0 – an app for tethered camera control & capture

Posted: January 16th, 2019 | Author: | Filed under: Entangle, Fedora, Photography | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

I am pleased to announce a new release 2.0 of Entangle is available for download from the usual location:

  https://entangle-photo.org/download/

This release is largely bug fixes with a couple of small features

  • Require gobject introspection >= 1.54
  • Require GTK3 >= 3.22
  • Fix dependency on libraw
  • Fix variable name in photobox plugin
  • Document some missing keyboard shortcuts
  • Fix upper bound in histogram to display clipped pixel
  • Refresh translations
  • Option to highlight over exposed pixels in red
  • Disable noisy compiler warning
  • Remove use of deprecated application menu concept
  • Fix image redraw when changing some settings
  • Update mailing list address in appdaat
  • Add more fields to appdata content
  • Fix refrence counting during window close
  • Use correct API for destroying top level windows
  • Fix unmounting of cameras with newer gvfs URI naming scheme
  • Avoid out of bounds read of property values
  • Fix many memory leaks
  • Workaround for combo boxes not displaying on Wayland
  • Fix race condition in building enums
  • Fix setting of gschema directory during startup
  • Set env to ensure plugins can find introspection typelib Requires

Improved translation po file handling by ditching gettext autotools integration

Posted: November 29th, 2018 | Author: | Filed under: Coding Tips, Fedora, libvirt, Virt Tools | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

The libvirt library has long provided translations of its end user facing strings, which largely means error messages and console output from command line tools / daemons. Since libvirt uses autotools for its build system, it naturally used the standard automake integration provided by gettext for handling .po files. The libvirt.pot file with master strings is exported to Zanata, where the actual translation work is outsourced to the Fedora translation team who support up to ~100 languages. At time of writing libvirt has some level of translation in ~45 languages.

With use of Zanata, libvirt must periodically create an updated libvirt.pot file and push it to Zanata, and then just before release it must pull the latest translated .po files back into GIT for release.

There have been a number of problems with this approach which have been annoying us pretty much since the start, and earlier this year it finally became too much to bear any longer.

  • The per-language translation files stored in git contain source file name and line number annotations to indicate where each translatable string originates. Since the translation files are not re-generated on every single source file changes, the file locations annotations becomes increasingly out of date after every commit. When the translation files are updated 98% of the diff is simply changing source file locations leading to a very poor signal/noise ratio.
  • The strings in the per-language translation files are sorted according to source filename. Thus when code is moved between files, or when files are renamed, the strings in the updated translation files all get needlessly reordered, again leading to a poor signal/noise ratio in diffs.
  • Each language translation file contains every translatable string even those which do not have any translation yet. This makes sense if translators are working directly against the .po files, but in libvirt everything is done via the Zanata UI which already knows the list of untranslated strings.
  • The per-language translation files grow in size over time with previously used message strings appended to the end of the file, never discarded by the gettext tools. This again makes sense if translators are working directly against .po files, but Zanata already provides a full translation memory containing historically used strings.
  • Whenever ‘make dist’ is run the gettext autotools integration will regenerate the per-language translation files. As a result of the three previous points, every time a release is made there’s a giant commit more than 100MB in size that contains diffs for translated files which are entirely noise and no signal.

One suggested approach to deal with this is to stop storing translations in GIT at all and simply export them from Zanata only at time of ‘make dist’. The concern with this approach is that the GIT repository no longer contains the full source for the project in a self-contained manner. ‘make dist‘ now needs a live network connection to the Zanata servers. If we were to replace Zanata with a new tool in the future (Zanata is already a replacement for the previously used Transifex), we would potentially loose access to translations for old releases.

With this in mind we decided to optimize the way translations are managed in GIT.

The first easy win was to simply remove the master libvirt.pot file from GIT entirely. This file is auto-generated from the source files and is out of date the moment any source file changes, so no one would ever want to use the stored copy.

The second more complex step was to minimize and canonicalize the per-language translation files. msgmerge is used to take the full .po file and strip out the source file locations and sort the string alphabetically. A perl script is then used to further process the content dropping any translations marked as “fuzzy” and drop any strings for which there is no translated text available. The resulting output is still using the normal .po file format but we call these ‘.mini.po‘ files to indicate that they are stripped down compared to what you’d normally expect to see.

The final step was to remove the gettext / autotools integration and write a custom Makefile.am to handle the key tasks.

  • A target ‘update-mini-po‘ to automate the process of converting full .po files into .mini.po files. This is used when pulling down new translations from Zanata to be stored in git before release.
  • A target ‘update-po’ to automate the inverse process of converting .mini.po files back into full .po files. This is to be used by anyone who might need to look at full language translations outside of Zanata.
  • An install hook to generate the binary .gmo files from the .mini.po files and install them into /usr/share/locale for use at runtime. This avoids the need to ship the full .po files in release tarballs.
  • A target ‘zanata-push‘ to automate the process of re-generating the libvirt.pot file and uploading it to Zanata.
  • A target ‘zanata-pull‘ to automate the process of pulling new translations down from zanata and then triggering ‘update-mini-po

After all this work was completed the key benefits are

  • The size of content stored in GIT was reduced from ~100MB to ~18MB.
  • Updates to the translations in GIT now produce small diffstats with a high signal/noise ratio
  • Files stored in GIT are never changed as a side effect of build system commands like ‘make dist’
  • The autotools integration is easier to understand

while not having any visible change on the translators using Zanata. In the event anyone does need to see full translation languages outside of Zanata there is an extra step to generate the full .po files from the .mini.po files but this is countered by the fact that the result will be fully up to date with respect to translatable strings and source file locations.

I’d encourage any project which is using gettext autotools integration, while also outsourcing to a system like Zanata, to consider whether they’d benefit from taking similar steps to libvirt. Not all projects will get the same degree of space saving but diffstats with good signal/noise ratios and removing side effects from ‘make dist’ are wins that are likely desirable for any project.

 

ANNOUNCE: gtk-vnc 0.9.0 release

Posted: August 17th, 2018 | Author: | Filed under: Fedora, Gtk-Vnc, libvirt, Virt Tools | No Comments »

I’m pleased to announce a new release of GTK-VNC, version 0.9.0. This is a cleanup/modernization release. Note that the next release (1.0.0) will drop support for GTK-2

  • Requires gnutls >= 3.1.18
  • Requires libgcrypt >= 1.5.0
  • Requires glib2 >= 2.42.0
  • Use libgcrypt for DES routines
  • Add missing cipher close calls in ARD auth
  • Check for errors after reading mslogon params
  • Support newer UltraVNC mslogon auth type code
  • Avoid divide by zero in mslogin auth from bogus params
  • Re-allow python2 accidentally blocked when removing python binding

Thanks to all those who reported bugs and provides patches that went into this new release.